Every week we have dozens of folks come to us with their software ideas, and even before they ask how much it’ll cost to build (we answer that question here if you’re interested), they first ask us, ‘is this a good idea?’.

Whether you’re flying solo, have a small startup, or run a giant company, it’s important to determine which ideas are worth spending the time and money on. 


Read on to see our guide to figuring out if this software idea is a winner.

Will it Bring Value to Users?

The first thing you must make clear is what value your software would bring to users. What problem are you looking to solve? If your idea solves a real problem that exists for users, then you’re on to something.

What Differentiates Your Software From Others?

Humans are innovative and curious by nature, which means there really are few completely original ideas. Ask any software development company how many times they’ve heard a client say they want to create the “Uber of <insert software idea here>”.

Don’t get me wrong, though. Competiton is healthy. Many times when users believe they have the best possible solution for their problem already, someone else comes along with something even better, blowing the competition out of the water.


So, before you jump into building your software, ask yourself how you’re different. Why would a user switch from a competitor to you? If the answer alludes you, we’d suggest you go back to the drawing board before moving forward.

Will Your Software Make Money?

How are you going to profit from this software? If you’re like most folks, you want to market and sell your finished product. This early in the game, you don’t need to draw up solid financial plans, but consider how this software will generate funds. Is there a monthly subscription? Are you considering white labeling and selling to other companies? And, how much are users willing to pay? How much do they pay for your competitor’s software?

Seek Out Your Critics

Listening to someone tell you that your idea sucks never feels good. But, criticism is important! Listen thoughtfully to the apprehension and questions of those who aren’t fans of your idea. Then, if you feel the complaints were justified, consider making changes that would remedy the problems they point out.


We hope this checklist was helpful in determining if your software idea is a keeper. If you’ve found a few places for improvement, take some time to reevaluate your idea and then if you feel comfortable moving forward with development, give SOLTECH a call. We’ve built custom software for nearly 20 years, for individuals, startups, and Fortune 500 companies, and we’ve love to help you realize your software dreams, too.

If you’d like to know more about custom software development, visit the Learning Center.
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